How to Set Up an RSS Feed from Social Mention

By James T. Cains

Say your company has launched a new product and you’re using Social Mention to monitor what people are saying about it out in the social universe. So, you find yourself, day after day, searching for the same words or phrases. Well, you can make life a lot easier for yourself by setting up an RSS feed from the Social Mention site containing those search words and phrases. You can monitor that feed from any program that can read RSS feeds, such as Microsoft Outlook, Firefox, or Google Reader.

RSS stands for rich site summary or, perhaps more commonly, really simple syndication. In a nutshell, this means that the Web site has made available to RSS subscribers the ability to be notified of new content without having to visit the site. After you subscribe to an RSS feed, your RSS feed reader continually monitors a site’s XML feed for new content. Usually, sites make only certain information available in an RSS feed, such as an article title, date published, a link to the article, and perhaps a brief summary. You still have to visit the site to read the full content, but at least you can choose what you’re interested in from the RSS feed.

Social Mention’s RSS feed enables you to see the results for particular searches you perform, filtered the way you want them. For example, say you search for your new product’s name, and then filter down to microblogs to see only the results from Facebook, Twitter, and the like. To turn this into an RSS feed, click the orange RSS Feed icon in the top right of the Social Mention search results page. You see a page that may look similar to Figure 1.

Figure 1: Creating an RSS feed.

Figure 1: Creating an RSS feed.

Source: socialmention.com

Depending on your browser, you may see options for subscribing to the RSS feed, depending on which programs you have installed on your computer. Choose the program in which you want to view the feed. For example, in Figure 1, Live Bookmarks is Firefox’s RSS reader. Or you may discover that you have an application, such as Microsoft Outlook, that is already set as the default RSS reader, in which case the feed will automatically be added to that program.

Some browsers may not give you options; instead, it may show you just the XML of the feed itself. In this case, you have to do a little manual work. Figure 2 shows opening an RSS feed in Google Chrome. What you want to do is find an RSS feed reader, such as Google Reader, Amphetadesk, FeedReader, and then copy and paste the URL into the feed reader. You can then save that feed to view anytime you want without having to visit the Social Mention Web site.

Figure 2: An RSS feed’s XML.

Figure 2: An RSS feed’s XML.

Source: socialmention.com