How to Set Up Universal Office for Windows 10

By Woody Leonhard

Although definitions vary, many people feel that “Office” includes Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and OneNote. If that matches your definition and expectations, you already have 40 percent of the battle won: Outlook (in the form of the Universal Windows Mail app), its cohort the Universal Calendar, and OneNote all ship, preinstalled on Windows 10.

Outlook (Mail), Calendar, and OneNote ship with Windows 10.

Outlook (Mail), Calendar, and OneNote ship with Windows 10.

The other three apps can be downloaded, individually, from the Windows Store. Or you can retrieve them by using the Get Office tile on the right side of the Start menu. In fact, even if your machine already has the touch-centric Universal version of Word, Excel, and PowerPoint, it’d be a good idea to make sure they’re up to date.

Here’s how to snag the latest:

  1. Click Start, All Apps, Windows Store.

    That brings up the Windows Store. Rocket Science.

  2. In the search box in the upper right, type Word and press Enter.

    You see results that look, more or less, like those in the following figure.

  3. This part’s important. You’re looking for Word, not Metro Word (from livingenzyme), not Word Solver. Tap or click Word, and then tap or click Free.

    The Store may take a while to download it, but when it’s finally finished, you get a notice that This Product is Installed.

  4. Click Start, and under Recently Added, you should see Word. Tap or click it.

    That starts Word with a quick tutorial. When you’re finished, close Word.

  5. Repeat steps 2 through 4 for Excel and again for PowerPoint.

    You should have all five Universal Office apps — six, if you include Calendar — ready to use.

    The results of a search on “Word.”

While you’re still thinking about it, pin icons for your commonly used Office apps to the taskbar. If you use them frequently enough, you should also stick them on the right side of the Start menu, and maybe even put a link to each on your desktop. Here’s how:

  1. Click Start, All Apps. Find Word — it may be near the top, in Recently Installed Apps, or it may be farther down the screen in alphabetical order. Right-click (or tap and hold) Word.

    You see the four options shown in the following figure.

  2. If you want Word to appear among the tiles on the right side of the Start menu, or if you want to put a shortcut to Word on your desktop, choose Pin to Start.

    That sticks a Word tile on the right side of the Start menu.

  3. If you want a link to Word on your desktop, click the Word tile on the right side of the Start menu and drag it to the desktop.

    That puts a link to Word on the desktop. If you really don’t want a separate tile in the Start menu for Word, you can right-click the tile and choose Unpin from Start.

  4. Again in the All Apps list (refer to the following figure), if you want to pin Word to your taskbar, right-click Word and choose Pin to Taskbar.

  5. Repeat Steps 1 through 4 for Excel and/or PowerPoint.

    That leaves you with clickable tiles on the Start menu, icons on the taskbar, and optional links on the desktop, all pointing to your favorite Universal Windows touch-centric versions of the Office apps.

    You have four different ways to skin the Word cat.

    You have four different ways to skin the Word cat.