Top 10 Data Visualization Resources

By Mico Yuk, Stephanie Diamond

To help you use data visualizations to help your data tell interesting stories and provide a competitive advantage, here are ten examples to look at for inspiration. You may want to bookmark the sites in your Internet browser and check them out on a regular basis. New trends and information are being shared daily.

  • Edward Tufte: Yale University Professor Edward Tufte’s views on data visualization have helped shape the industry. He provides compelling discussions and insights through his blog and his always-sold-out courses.

  • The site is 100 percent infographics. Whether you want to have the company create one for you or you want to pore over the vast collection, this site has something for everyone. You can use the database to search by topic or industry, such as animals, technology, social media, and geography. It’s great for inspiration, creativity, and brainstorming.

  • The Functional Art: The Functional Art is a great blog that’s an outgrowth of the book of the same name by University of Miami Professor Albert Cairo. Cairo has an active online presence. He provides insight and classes that help beginners take their data viz skills to the next level.

  • Visualizing Data: The diverse Visualizing Data blog on the Harvard Business Review site covers the most important topics relating to data visualization, including when you shouldn’t use data viz and whether you are getting enough value from the data viz you created. You’ll always find insightful and thought-provoking points of view, and learn from some of the most brilliant minds in the field.

  • Chart Porn: Chart Porn is a great site with a provocative name and lots of inspiring examples of data visualizations. It offers data visualizations based on global topics and trends. As the racy title implies, the site provides some amazing examples of charts, infographics, and maps.

  • The Excel Charts Blog: Jorge Camoes has done a great job of providing free tutorials, discussions, and best practices for creating data visualizations in Microsoft Excel. His blog is a great Excel resource for newbies and introduces you to best practices.

  • FlowingData: You’ll never get bored with Nathan Yau’s perspective on data; he hovers between data scientist and graphic designer. On his FlowingData site, he writes with humor and clear opinions on the data visualization industry. (Some content is available to the general public, but you have to have a subscription to be able to access everything the site offers.) He also has several excellent books on the market, and his blog provides great real-world examples of data visualizations.

  • You can find a useful list of top data viz events around the world here. This site is great for those who want to dive a bit deeper and meet like-minded people.

  • GE Data Visualization: As one of the biggest companies in the world, General Electric (GE) uses its data viz site to show the world how it operates and gives examples from a variety of different fields. The data visualizations are fascinating, and they help the company showcase its successes. Kudos to GE for riding the front of the data viz wave.

  • #dataviz and #bigdata: You can find some of the best, most up-to-date resources and information about data viz by tracking the #dataviz hashtag on Twitter. The same goes for #bigdata. You’ll often see tweets by some of the other resources listed in this article.