Exposure in Digital Photography

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HDR Photography: Prepare to Manually Bracket a Scene

Some digital cameras do not have Auto Exposure Bracketing, which is used for making high dynamic range images. Some, for example, the Sony Alpha 300 — a great entry-level dSLR that has auto bracketing [more…]

HDR Photography: How to Dial in Auto Bracketing

Auto exposure bracketing (AEB) is a fantastic time-saver for high dynamic range photography. You don’t have to fiddle with exposure controls in the middle of the shot, as with manual bracketing. All you [more…]

HDR Photography: Set Up Auto Exposure Bracketing

Some cameras require pre-configuring underlying AEB settings before using auto bracketing. A Nikon D200 is used here to illustrate the steps to set up auto exposure bracketing. That’s right — this step [more…]

HDR Photography: Exposure

Because high dynamic range photography involves getting around the limitations of dynamic range in modern digital photography, it stands to reason that exposure is a critical concept to understand. When [more…]

HDR Photography: Photographic Stops/EV

A photographic stop is a principle that allows you to compare changes in exposure, which is an important concept for understanding high dynamic range photography. One stop doubles or halves the amount [more…]

HDR Photography: Bracketing

Bracketing is taking two or more photographs with different exposures of the same scene at the same time. It's an important step in high dynamic photography. [more…]

Meter with Your Camera in HDR Photography

Using a preconceived bracketing strategy in high dynamic range (HDR) photography works well, but the downside is not knowing whether you’re really capturing the full dynamic range of the scene with the [more…]

When to Shoot Single Exposures for HDR Photography

You need to know when and why to shoot single exposures for high dynamic range photography. This assures that you choose the right tool for the job, given the gear you have and the circumstance you’re [more…]

Minimum Requirements for Single-Shot HDR Photography

Single-exposure high dynamic range photography is a viable way to wring as much dynamic range from a single Raw photo as possible. The technology simply doesn’t exist to enable you to go out and shoot [more…]

Single-Exposure HDR Photography Terminology

High dynamic range photography has a lot of terminology competing to use the same words (exposure, bracket, Raw). It can be very confusing. For the purpose of clarity, some photographers distinguish between [more…]

Shoot HDR Photographs on the Go

This example is another reason single-exposure high dynamic range is so much fun and accessible. This photograph was taken with a smaller, lighter dSLR [more…]

Decide How Many Brackets to Shoot in HDR

Knowing how many brackets to shoot is clearly an important factor in high dynamic range (HDR) photography. It provides the much-needed information of where to start manual bracketing and how to configure [more…]

Choose between More and Fewer Brackets in HDR

Reading about why you can or should shoot more or fewer brackets in high dynamic range (HDR) photography is one thing. Seeing the difference among different numbers of brackets of the same scene — and [more…]

Understand Bracketing in HDR Photography

Shooting brackets is where it’s at in high dynamic range (HDR) photography. This is where you feel the most like an HDR photographer because it’s different from shooting single exposures. Make sure your [more…]

How to Use Manual Bracketing in HDR Photography

Manual bracketing in high dynamic range (HDR) photography means that you directly manipulate shutter speed and watch its effect on EV. One of the main reasons to use manual bracketing is if your camera [more…]

How to Use Auto Bracketing in HDR Photography

Auto bracketing in high dynamic range (HDR) photography enables you to shoot faster. A camera with a normal frame rate can shoot faster brackets than even the most dexterous photographer in manual mode [more…]

Use a Light Meter to Bracket in HDR

Using a preconceived bracketing strategy in high dynamic range (HDR) photography works well, but the downside is not knowing whether you’re really capturing the full dynamic range of the scene with the [more…]

Meter with AEB or Manual Mode in HDR

Using a preconceived bracketing strategy in high dynamic range (HDR) photography works well, but the downside is not knowing whether you’re really capturing the full dynamic range of the scene with the [more…]

How to Use Exposure Compensation in HDR Photography

Exposure compensation is a fallback method to shoot brackets in high dynamic range (HDR) photography. If you don’t have a camera that has a manual shooting mode or AEB [more…]

HDR Work-Flow for Single-Exposure Photographs

By and large, single-exposure high dynamic range follows the same workflow as bracketed HDR photography. There may be minor differences, so here is a run-through of the work-flow: [more…]

Shoot Multiple Auto Brackets in HDR Photography

In high dynamic range (HDR) photography, if you have Auto Exposure Bracketing (AEB) on your camera, but don’t have the greatest exposure value (EV) range [more…]

Choosing Sony Alpha A65/A77 Scenes

In the Sony Alpha's A65/A77 Scene Selection mode, you choose a scene per the kind of photo you’re taking: portraits, action, and nighttime shots benefit from different Scene Selection modes; and macros [more…]

How to Capture Close-Ups in Digital Wedding Photography

Though a wedding has a lot of fast-paced movement for a photographer to capture, it also has quiet times that present golden opportunities for some really great photos. Some of the most iconic pictures [more…]

How to Manually Set Exposure on Your Digital SLR

One of the most powerful exposure tools in your dSLR arsenal is you. Given an understanding of what you want to accomplish creatively, combined with the limitations of your equipment and the lighting on [more…]

How to Use the Autoexposure (AE) Lock on Your Digital SLR

The Autoexposure (AE) Lock on your dSLR lets you meter and focus on one area of the scene, lock the autoexposure reading into the camera, recompose the shot, and then take the photo with the original exposure [more…]

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