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Vital Stats and Materials List for the Hive-Top Feeder

The hive-top feeder is just one of several feeder designs you can use to offer sugar syrup to your bees when the nectar flow is minimal or nonexistent. Feeders also provide a convenient way to medicate [more…]

Part of the Series: The Hive-Top Feeder: How to Build Your Own

Cut List for the Hive-Top Feeder

When building a hive-top feeder, it's easiest to break it down into its individual components — the following tables show you how and provide instructions on how to cut those components. Separate cut sheets [more…]

Part of the Series: The Hive-Top Feeder: How to Build Your Own

Cut List for the IPM Screened Bottom-Board

When building an IPM screened bottom-board for bee hives, it's easiest to break it down into its individual components — the following tables show you how and provide instructions on how to cut those components [more…]

Part of the Series: IPM Screened Bottom-Board for Hives: How to Build Your Own

How to Assemble the IPM Screened Bottom-Board

Using a screened bottom-board in a hive offers the great advantage of improved ventilation. Poor ventilation is one of the leading causes of stress on a bee colony. A screened bottom-board [more…]

Part of the Series: IPM Screened Bottom-Board for Hives: How to Build Your Own

Vital Stats and Materials List for the IPM Screened Bottom-Board

A screened bottom-board really helps with mite control in your bee hive, and you find out how to build one here. With varroa mites a problem for many beekeepers, screened bottom-boards are gaining popularity [more…]

Part of the Series: IPM Screened Bottom-Board for Hives: How to Build Your Own

How to Assemble an Elevated Hive Stand

Now that you've cut out all the parts, it's time to build your elevated bee hive stand. Remember, you need an elevated stand for every hive. [more…]

Part of the Series: The Elevated Hive Stand: How to Make Your Own

Vital Stats and Materials List for the Elevated Hive Stand

Elevated hive stands keep your bee hives well off the damp ground and provides better air circulation, which keeps the colony drier. The hive's elevation helps deter skunks and other pests from snacking [more…]

Part of the Series: The Elevated Hive Stand: How to Make Your Own

Cut List for an Elevated Hive Stand

When building an elevated hive stand for your bee, it's easiest to break it down into its individual components — the following tables show you how and provide instructions on how to cut those components [more…]

Part of the Series: The Elevated Hive Stand: How to Make Your Own

How to Assemble Langstroth Frames

You assemble all of the Langstroth frames, no matter the size, in an identical manner. Follow these instructions for each frame you put together. Putting together frames can be monotonous, but the assembly [more…]

Part of the Series: Langstroth Frames for Hives: How to Build Your Own

Vital Stats and Materials List for Langstroth Frames

Langstroth frames for bee hives come in three basic sizes — deep, medium, and shallow — corresponding to deep hive bodies and medium or shallow honey supers. The method for cutting and assembling deep, [more…]

Part of the Series: Langstroth Frames for Hives: How to Build Your Own

Cut List for Langstroth Frames

The following tables break down the various Langstroth frames into their individual components and provide instructions on how to cut those components for deep, medium, and shallow frames. [more…]

Part of the Series: Langstroth Frames for Hives: How to Build Your Own

How to Make Tricky Cuts for Side Bars of Langstroth Frames

Side bars for your Langstroth hive frames have a wide profile at the top and taper to a more narrow profile at the bottom. This tapered shape provides the correct distance between frames and allows for [more…]

Part of the Series: Langstroth Frames for Hives: How to Build Your Own

How to Make Tricky Cuts for Top Bars of Langstroth Frames

The top bars of Langstroth bee hive frames require the trickiest cuts. Follow these steps and refer to the following figure to make these cuts. [more…]

Part of the Series: Langstroth Frames for Hives: How to Build Your Own

Ten Common Misconceptions about Chicken Health and Treatments

Here are ten of the most famous backyard flock-keeping myths. Busting these myths may burst some bubbles of wishful thinking, but hopefully, it also will ease some unnecessary worries. [more…]

Answers to Ten Common Questions about Chicken Health

Following are the most common questions that flock keepers ask about the health of their chickens. Also provided are quick, concise answers that you can take to heart or share with a fellow flock keeper [more…]

The Outside of the Chicken: Eyes, Ears, Skin, and Feathers

Being able to refer to the common names of the outside parts of the chicken is helpful when describing a problem to someone long distance and to ensuring the health of your flock. [more…]

The Respiratory System of a Chicken

The main job of the respiratory system of birds is to absorb oxygen and rid the body of carbon dioxide. In addition, the respiratory system also gets rid of excess heat, detoxifies some of the waste products [more…]

The Digestive System of a Chicken

Having a firm understanding of a chicken’s digestion system can help you figure out the reason behind a chicken’s digestive upsets. The figure shows the layout of the chicken digestive system, beginning [more…]

The Skeleton of a Chicken

Besides the obvious role of holding up the chicken, the skeletal system has at least two additional important functions: calcium storage, and believe it or not, breathing! [more…]

The Organs of a Chicken’s Immune System

You need to understand the chicken immune system, to familiarize you with that defense network, because flock owners need to know how to help their chickens protect themselves against and deal with infectious [more…]

Starting with the Chicken and Then the Egg: Growth and Development

So what is the answer to the age-old question: Which came first, the chicken or the egg? Well, here, you start with the chicken and end up with an egg. Along the way, you discover the reproductive ins [more…]

What Goes on in a Chicken Egg

A chicken egg is a complete package of nutrition and protection for the developing embryo chick. The yolk, egg white, and shell provide all the nutrients the embryo needs for the 21-day incubation period [more…]

Life Outside the Egg: A Chick’s First Few Weeks

For the first few days after hatching, a chick can’t maintain her own body temperature and needs to be kept warm, either by mother hen’s body heat or by a supplemental heat source that you can provide. [more…]

Coccidiosis in Chickens

Coccidiosis is such a common and serious problem for flock keepers everywhere. Microscopic coccidia parasites are the archenemies of poultry farmers, who must spend tremendous amounts of effort and money [more…]

Parasitic Worms in Chickens

A zoo of parasitic worms can be found in chicken flocks. Worms find cozy places to stay in the crop, gizzard, intestine, cecum, windpipe, and even the eyelids. [more…]

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