Basic German: Pronouncing Consonants
How to Ask Questions in German
How to Count in German

Words Lent to and Borrowed from German

A few German words have been adopted by the English language and have retained their meaning, such as Kindergarten (kin-der-gâr-ten), Angst (ânkst), kaputt (kâ-poot), Ersatz (êr-zats), Sauerkraut (zou-er-krout), Zeitgeist (tsayt-gayst), and Wanderlust (vân-der-loost).

However, the number of these German words is minimal compared to the number of English words that have made their way into the German language. At times, the combination of English and German makes for somewhat curious linguistic oddities. For example, you may hear das ist total in/out (dâs ist toh-tahl in/out [as in English]) (that’s totally in/out) or Sie können den File downloaden (zee kern-en deyn file [as in English] doun-lohd-en) (You can download the file).

The following is a list of German words that have been borrowed from the English language. Note that they all retain their English pronunciations, with one slight exception: The borrowed verbs are “Germanified,” which simply means they combine the English verb, such as kill or jog, with -en, the German suffix that creates the infinitive form (to kill and to jog).

  • das Baby

  • der Boss

  • das Business

  • das Catering

  • die City (downtown)

  • der Computer

  • cool

  • das Design

  • das Event

  • Fashion (used without article)

  • das Fast Food

  • das Feeling

  • flirten (to flirt)

  • der Headhunter

  • Hi

  • hip

  • der Hit

  • das Hotel

  • das Internet

  • das Interview

  • der Jetlag

  • der Job

  • joggen (to jog)

  • killen (to kill)

  • klicken (to click)

  • managen (to manage)

  • der Manager

  • das Marketing

  • das Meeting

  • Okay

  • online

  • outsourcen (to outsource)

  • die Party

  • pink

  • das Shopping

  • die Shorts

  • die Show/Talkshow

  • das Steak

  • stoppen (to stop)

  • surfen (to surf waves or the Internet)

  • das Team

  • der Thriller

  • der Tourist

  • der Trainer

  • das T-Shirt

  • der Workshop

  • Wow

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