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Typical Location Shots for Dog Photography

All sorts of options for outdoor dog photographs are just waiting beyond your front door, but before you pack your bags and head off into the wilderness with Buster, take stock of the wonderful natural world around you. You don’t have to go far to get photos that look like you did.

It’s amazing what you can find if you look around and get creative. That small sliver of prairie grass can look like an untouched frontier if you shoot from the right angle. You don’t need much to create an entire world within a photograph.

Backyard/front yard locations for dog photography

If you want to take photos of your dog off-leash, your safest option is your own yard (provided it’s securely fenced-in). This picture of Daisy was taken in a secure front yard where she felt safe enough to lie down and relax. The great thing about using that location is that it’s probably where you’re both most comfortable.

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70mm, 1/200 sec., f/3.2, 125

When you shoot in your yard, incorporate unique features and even surrounding areas into your photos. Consider taking pictures of Pancake

  • Peeking out of her doghouse

  • Soaking up the sun on the patio or porch

  • Lying in front of an interesting-looking fence or gate — or even keeping her neighborhood watch from it

  • Sniffing or sitting among flowers or plants

  • Resting in her favorite shady spot

  • Begging at the grill if she’s a grill hound

  • Sitting at the mailbox if she likes to greet the mail carrier

Park location for dog photography

If you don’t have a yard (or one that works for these purposes), a public park is a great option. The thing to keep in mind is that you want a park that’s as empty of people and other dogs as possible (so that rules out dog parks). You don’t need a huge area; smaller parks work just fine for your purposes.

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28mm, 1/400 sec., f/2.8, 100

And don’t just stop with the grass. Look around to see what kinds of features you can work into your shots.

For example, sit Heidi on an old bench or picnic table. Or how about a shot of her sneaking a sip from the water fountain? Or if she’s up for it, try some fun photos of her on playground equipment (as long as it’s safe and allowed). There are dozens of possibilities!

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