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Solving the Mystery of the Disappearing Record in Access 2002

"The record was there — right there!" The key word in that sentence is the verb, because it indicates that the record isn't there now. Precisely where the record went is a moot point because only the computer knows, and machines have a code of silence about these details. (It's a subset of the rules that make all the copiers break at the same time.)

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Don't panic. Panicky people make strange changes, and you need your wits about you for the next few minutes. You can panic later after the dust settles.

Before doing anything technical with Access 2002 (or hitting the computer with a baseball bat), press Ctrl+Z. That's the Undo command. If the record comes back, you're done. In that case, close the table and go have a panic attack in the break room.

If the Undo command didn't accomplish anything, you're in slightly more trouble. The next best solution is to copy the record from a backup of the database file. This solution works only if you backed up your database at some point. If you have a paper copy of the data, you can always manually re-enter it into the database. If that record was your only copy of the information, then raise your hand, look at the computer, and wave bye-bye, because it's gone now (you have my deepest sympathy).

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Please, oh please, keep current backups of your information. You never know when bad things will happen (insert eerie organ music here).

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