Setting up the Cisco Wireless LAN Controller(s)

After unpacking your Cisco Wireless LAN Controller (WLC), connect the console cable to the service port and set your computer’s terminal settings to the following:

  • 9600 bps

  • 8 data bits

  • 1 stop bit

  • No parity

  • No hardware flow control

Mucking about with the Startup Wizard

When powering up your WLC, you need to perform some configuration. You are presented with the Startup Wizard, which does the following tasks:

  • Ensures that the controller has a system name of up to 32 characters.

  • Adds an administrative username and password, each up to 24 characters.

  • Ensures that the controller can communicate with the GUI, CLI, or Cisco WCS through the service port by accepting a valid Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) configuration or manual IP address and netmask.

    Entering 0.0.0.0 for the IP address and netmask disables the service port.

  • Ensures that the controller can communicate with the network (802.11 distribution system) through the management interface, having you assign a static IP address, netmask, default router IP address, VLAN identifier, and physical port assignment.

  • Prompts for the IP address of the DHCP server used to supply IP addresses to clients and the controller management interface.

  • Asks for the Lightweight Access Point Protocol (LWAPP) Transport mode.

  • Collects the virtual gateway IP address — any fictitious, unassigned IP address (such as 1.1.1.1) to be used by Layer 3 security and mobility managers.

  • Allows you to enter the mobility group (RF group) name, which is just a descriptive name for a group of APs.

  • Collects the wireless LAN 802.11 SSID, or network name.

  • Asks you to indicate whether clients can use static IP addresses. Allowing this option is more convenient for some users but offers less security. Disallowing this option requires that all devices get their IP configuration from a DHCP server.

  • Asks whether you want to configure a Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service (RADIUS) server from the Startup Wizard. If you do want to use RADIUS, you are prompted for the server IP address, communication port, and shared secret (password).

  • Collects the country code to ensure that it configures the radios for the local region.

  • Enables or disables the 802.11a/n and 802.11b/g/n lightweight access point networks.

  • Enables or disables Radio Resource Management (RRM).

Verifying connectivity to the wired LAN

If you have connected your management cable, proceeded through the Startup Wizard, and provided it all the information it required, you now have a running WLC supporting at least one SSID. If you choose to, you can perform any remaining configuration changes either from a remote terminal or via the web-based GUI.

Enabling the 802.11 bands

Using the command-line interface (CLI), you can enable or disable the supported radios with the following commands:

config 802.11a disable network
config 802.11b disable network
config 802.11a enable network
config 802.11b enable network
config {802.11a | 802.11b} 11nsupport {enable | disable}

To save and view your configuration changes, use the following commands:

save config
show {802.11a | 802.11b}

You then see output that looks something like this:

802.11a Network............................... Enabled
11nSupport.................................... Enabled
802.11a Low Band........................... Enabled
802.11a Mid Band........................... Enabled
802.11a High Band.......................... Enabled
802.11a Operational Rates
802.11a 6M Rate.............................. Mandatory
802.11a 9M Rate.............................. Supported
802.11a 12M Rate............................. Mandatory
802.11a 18M Rate............................. Supported
802.11a 24M Rate............................. Mandatory
802.11a 36M Rate............................. Supported
802.11a 48M Rate............................. Supported
802.11a 54M Rate............................. Supported
...

Configuring the SSID

In the case of Cisco Wireless LAN Controllers, an SSID is configured as part of a WLAN so that each WLAN maps to an SSID. Within the WLAN settings, you can configure security, quality of service (QoS), radio policies, and other wireless network settings. Each controller supports up to 16 WLANs.

The following commands allow you to configure an additional SSID:

show wlan summary
config wlan create wlan_id profile_name ssid

When the WLAN is created, it is automatically disabled for security. After you have completed all your security settings, you can enable the WLAN with the following commands:

config wlan enable wlan_id
save config
blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement

Inside Dummies.com