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Sample Thank You and Follow-Up Job Letters

Use targeted thank-you and follow-up letters to market yourself and to add that extra edge. A follow up or thank you note can win you the job you're seeking. Although most jobs are won or lost during the interview, sometimes the finalists are so comparable in qualifications that the best-remembered candidate wins the position. Letters can revive memories.

Pay attention to the finer points in the following samples from professional writers credited at the bottom of each letter:

  • Human glimpses. A candidate for a teaching assistant position (Byers) at a school for the hearing-impaired refers to her nurturing personality — “Feeling empathy and relating well to others are in my DNA.” Revealing admirable human characteristics and sharing an unusual story are other techniques that make a candidate unforgettable.

    [Credit: Susan Guarneri, MRW, CERW, CPRW, CPBS, NCCC, DCC — Three Lakes, Wis.]
    Credit: Susan Guarneri, MRW, CERW, CPRW, CPBS, NCCC, DCC — Three Lakes, Wis.

Click here to view this thank-you letter.

  • Serious summaries. A candidate competes for a position as a senior budget analyst (Woods) by listing six key competencies in bullet-bold statements. Thank-you letters are a contender’s last easy chance to cement a “best of the bunch” image. They are especially valuable to stimulate favorable memories when a candidate interviewed early in the selection process is followed by equally strong competitors.

    [Credit: Phyllis Houston, PARW-CC, NRWA — Upper Marlboro, Md.]
    Credit: Phyllis Houston, PARW-CC, NRWA — Upper Marlboro, Md.

Click here to view this thank-you letter.

  • Postscript deal-sealers. A legal administrative assistant (Morris) reminds the interviewer of her mastery of the position’s required skills and comes across as a pleasant person to work with. Her P.S. assures the reader that she’s a quick and enthusiastic learner.

    A postscript is eye candy. Shrewd writers don’t waste this valuable space on “oops, I forgot” statements, but instead use it to impel the reader’s interest.

    [Credit: Kathleen Marshall, NRWA — Medford, N.J.]
    Credit: Kathleen Marshall, NRWA — Medford, N.J.

Click here to view this thank-you letter.

  • Hard-selling pitches. A commercial real estate sales manager (Anderson) writes a strong and convincing letter explaining why he can deliver deals even in a city where he doesn’t know the real estate turf. Reinforcing an ability to bridge a divide — using rationales of crossover skills and networking skills — a motivated job seeker can wind up on the right side of a hiring decision.

    [Credit: Wendy Enelow, CCM, MRW, JCTC, CPRW — Coleman Falls, Va.]
    Credit: Wendy Enelow, CCM, MRW, JCTC, CPRW — Coleman Falls, Va.

Click here to view this follow-up letter.

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