Online Test Banks
Score higher
See Online Test Banks
eLearning
Learning anything is easy
Browse Online Courses
Mobile Apps
Learning on the go
Explore Mobile Apps
Dummies Store
Shop for books and more
Start Shopping

Recording Great Backup Vocals

To record backup vocals, you can either track each part separately by using lead vocal microphone placement techniques or you can have all the backup singers sing at once into one or two microphones. If you do the latter, you can either use a stereo pair of microphones, a figure-8 microphone, or an omnidirectional microphone.

If you use a stereo pair of mics, set them up in a coincident X-Y pattern. Have the vocalists stand next to each other facing the mics at 3 or 4 feet away. Either large- or small-diaphragm mics work best for this setup. Check out the following illustration for a neat top view of this arrangement.

The X-Y stereo miking pattern can work well for backup vocals.
The X-Y stereo miking pattern can work well for backup vocals.

If you choose to use a figure-8 mic, the singers can stand on opposite sides of the mic. The advantage of this setup is that the singers can look at each other while they sing.

Backup singers can stand on either side of a figure-8 mic and see each other.
Backup singers can stand on either side of a figure-8 mic and see each other.

An omnidirectional mic can also work well for backup vocals. In this case, the singers stand in a circle around the mic, as shown in the following.

Singers stand in a circle around an omnidirectional mic.
Singers stand in a circle around an omnidirectional mic.
blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement

Inside Dummies.com

Dummies.com Sweepstakes

Win $500. Easy.