Recommended Diabetes Testing Schedule for Canadians

Part of the Diabetes For Canadians For Dummies Cheat Sheet

For you and your health care team to know whether your diabetes treatment plan is effective, you will need to undertake regular testing. The Canadian Diabetes Association recommends the following testing schedule for most adults with diabetes:

  • A1C: Every three months (up to every six months if your A1C is consistently within target).

  • Blood glucose meter:

    • Not taking insulin: individualized.

    • On one injection of insulin per day: at least once daily.

    • On two injections of insulin therapy per day: at least twice daily.

    • On three injections of insulin per day: at least three times daily.

    • On four or more injections of insulin per day or using an insulin pump: at least four times daily.

  • Lipids: Fasting total cholesterol (TC), HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides (or non-fasting apo B and non-HDL cholesterol) at time of diagnosis and then yearly (more frequently if treatment has been initiated or changed).

  • Urine albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR), blood creatinine, eGFR:

    • Type 1 diabetes: annually if you have had diabetes for more than five years (at least every six months if you have kidney damage).

    • Type 2 diabetes: at the time of diagnosis, then annually (at least every six months if you have kidney damage).

  • Electrocardiogram (EKG): At the time of diagnosis of diabetes if you are older than 40 years of age, (older than 30 years of age if you’ve had diabetes for more than 15 years), if you have evidence of organ damage associated with diabetes, or if you are at increased risk for heart disease. A repeat EKG should be performed every two years if you have type 2 diabetes.

  • Blood pressure: At every diabetes visit.

  • Screening for peripheral neuropathy (with a 10-gram monofilament or tuning fork):

    • Type 1 diabetes: annually beginning five years after the onset of diabetes.

    • Type 2 diabetes: at the time of diagnosis, then annually.

  • Foot examination:

    • By your doctor: at least annually (more frequently if you are at risk of foot ulceration).

    • By you: daily.

  • Eye exam (by an eye specialist):

    • Type 1 diabetes: annually, beginning five years after the onset of diabetes if you are 15 years of age or older (more frequent eye exams may be necessary depending on the presence and severity of retinopathy).

    • Type 2 diabetes: at the time of diagnosis and then every one to two years (more frequent eye exams may be necessary depending on the presence and severity of retinopathy).

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Diabetes For Canadians For Dummies Cheat Sheet

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