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Marketing: Impact and Communication

You need to communicate constantly in marketing. The more effectively you communicate, the better you’ll build sales and attract new customers. What’s the difference between good and poor marketing communications? The single most important difference is impact. Good communications have the desired impact; poor communications don’t.

The goals of your marketing communications should be twofold: to build awareness of your brand and offerings, and to stimulate interest in and purchases of them. You can accomplish these closely related goals by increasing the quality and quantity of your marketing communications. This list helps you do just that by showing you how to prioritize your communications, improve your writing, select stellar visuals, and more.

The best marketing communications are frequent, clear, consistent, attention-grabbing, persuasive, and accurate. To gauge how well you’re incorporating these priorities in your marketing communications, you need to conduct a marketing communications audit. This section goes into depth on these six priorities and how you can conduct an audit.

Perform your own marketing communications audit by first gathering examples of the ways in which you communicate with customers and the market in general. Include everything anyone sees, hears, or even smells and touches, including traditional advertising, mailings, web communications, packaging, signs, and so forth. Don’t forget to add snapshots of public communications — or lack thereof — on your building and vehicles to the pile of samples.

After you have your samples of all the ways in which you communicate, create a spreadsheet or table with each type of communication down the left side as labels for rows (for example, blogs, Google ads, trade magazine ads, and trade show booths). Then create columns for the following items:

  • Your estimate of what you spend per year on that type of communication

  • The frequency (quantity) of that communication, rated as very low, low, medium, high, or very high

  • The clarity of each communication (does it make its point sharply, quickly, clearly, well?), rated as very low, low, medium, high, or very high

  • The consistency of the communication’s message (does it reinforce a clear theme that can be seen in the other communications, too?), rated as very low, low, medium, high, or very high

  • The stopping power of the communication (in other words, how attention-grabbing it is), rated as very low, low, medium, high, or very high

  • The persuasiveness of the communication, rated as very low, low, medium, high, or very high

  • The accuracy of the communication, rated as very low, low, medium, high, or very high

Anything that doesn’t get high scores across the board should be dropped from the program or greatly improved.

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