Initial Cause Prospect Meeting: Better PowerPoints

With PowerPoint, people have gained the ability to share presentations on a screen or in a handout. But as was true with so many other advancements, something powerful has been given up in exchange.

Instead of developing and using skills as presenters, PowerPoint is relied upon to reduce the presenters role at meetings. But what really happens is a reduction of effectiveness. Prospects don’t buy from PowerPoint decks. They buy from people.

PowerPoint can be useful in a meeting. But like any technology, it makes a good servant, but a poor master. Here’s how to keep PowerPoint firmly under foot:

  • Use PowerPoint for what can’t be said or explained in words. PowerPoint isn’t meant to record every word of your presentation. Use PowerPoint when you find yourself saying, “I wish I could show this to you!” That’s the moment to include a slide to show the prospect exactly what you’re talking about.

    Or if cause marketing is completely foreign to your audience, a very simple visual can replace ten minutes of your trying to explain it to them. Now you can make your point in about 20 seconds. PowerPoint, when used well, is a tool to break down the walls of misunderstanding and ambiguity between you and the prospect.

    This slide was used to visually illustrate how cause marketing works. The program flows from cause
    This slide was used to visually illustrate how cause marketing works. The program flows from cause to company to consumer, and the benefits return to company and cause.
  • Limit one idea to each slide. Many PowerPoint slides have too much information on them. It’s better to communicate a single idea simply, directly, and powerfully. You may never get the chance to say everything you want to say, but your prospect will never forget that one thing you did say.

    Your slides need to have less information on them, not more. Limit yourself to one idea and a few k
    Your slides need to have less information on them, not more. Limit yourself to one idea and a few keywords.
  • Don’t use PowerPoint to share your agenda. Your PowerPoint is not your meeting agenda. They’re two different things. Your agenda, if you have one, is something you bring to a meeting and share with your prospect on a separate sheet of paper. It guides your meeting.

    Your PowerPoint is part of your presentation to your prospect. It clarifies and magnifies your message. As the name implies, don’t forget the power in your points when sharing a presentation with a prospect.

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