There are many ways to combine sentences in English. One useful trick for combining short sentences legally involves using the pronoun connection. Using pronouns to combine sentences is second-nature to native English speakers. If you are learning English, using pronouns can give your speaking and writing a more relaxed and natural cadence. Check out these combinations:

Sentence 1: Amy read the book.
Sentence 2: The book had a thousand pictures in it.
Joining: Amy read the book that had a thousand pictures in it.

Here the pronoun that stands in for the book.

Sentence 1: The paper map stuck to Wilbur’s shoe.
Sentence 2: We plan to use the map to take over the world.
Joining: The paper map, which we plan to use to take over the world, stuck to Wilbur’s shoe.

Here the relative pronoun which represents the map.

Sentence 1: Margaret wants to hire a carpenter.
Sentence 2: The carpenter will build a new ant farm for her pets.
Joining: Margaret wants to hire a carpenter who will build a new ant farm for her pets.

Who always represents a person or animal.

Sentence 1: The tax bill was passed yesterday.
Sentence 2: The tax bill will lower taxes for the top .00009% income bracket.
Joining: The tax bill that was passed yesterday will lower taxes for the top .00009% income bracket.
Alternate joining: The tax bill that was passed yesterday will lower taxes for Bill Gates. (Okay, that was a loose interpretation.)

That, which, and who are pronouns. In the combined sentences, each takes the place of a noun. These pronouns serve as thumbtacks, attaching a subordinate or less important idea to the main body of the sentence. For grammar trivia contests: that, which, and who (as well as whom and whose) are pronouns that may relate one idea to another. When they do that job, they are called relative pronouns.

Relative pronouns — like real relatives, at least in some families — can cause lots of problems. Therefore, the SAT and ACT hit this topic hard.

Combine these sentences with a pronoun.

Sentence 1: Charlie slowly tiptoed toward the venomous snakes.
Sentence 2: The snakes soon bit Charlie right on the tip of his nose.

Answer: Charlie slowly tiptoed toward the venomous snakes, which soon bit Charlie right on the tip of his nose. The pronoun which replaces snakes in sentence 2.