How to Use Power Phrases in Cover Letters

7 of 10 in Series: The Essentials of Cover Letters

After an attention-grabbing opening statement in a cover letter, you should flesh out the middle of the cover letter with power phrases and intriguing lines that strongly emphasize your belief in yourself and your strengths.

Don’t be shy about listing qualifications, skills, competencies, accomplishments, and achievements. Use numbers wherever you can. If you spot a concept you like in the following examples, think of a way to adapt it to your situation. Or mix and match the ideas expressed.

  • I am particularly well-qualified for your (job title) position, as the following highlights illustrate. I would enjoy the opportunity to meet with you to explore how I can contribute to your organization.

  • Your position for (job title) strongly appeals to me because (tell why).

  • If our meeting confirms my understanding of your open position for (job title), I am confident that with my skills in (name skills), I can make an immediate and valuable contribution to (name of employer).

  • As we discussed earlier, my extensive professional experience can benefit virtually any employer. However, (company name) is of special interest to me because (explain why).

  • (Name of employer’s company) ranks Number One in companies I prefer to join.

  • I look forward to meeting with you to further discuss my background and to show you some of the (skills or competencies) that I have developed.

  • What you’re asking for and what I can deliver sound like a match!

  • During my three years in purchasing with Tidewater Productions, I’ve been credited with yearly savings in the $50,000 to $75,000 range. This resulted from a combination of skillful negotiation and replacing underperforming vendors. Wouldn’t you like me to save money for your company?

  • Because I haven’t yet notified my current employer of my intent to leave, I count on your treating this response to your posting with appropriate sensitivity. (Employers often prefer to hire employed candidates, rather than unemployed candidates.)

  • I am happy with my job and am considered to be a high performer by my current employer. Unfortunately, I do not see a path to advancement in the foreseeable future. That is why I am contacting you about future openings in the (career field or functional area) at (name of organization).

  • One of my friends, Salvador Rondavi, works for your company. He recommends that I contact you about a position as a management trainee. He is more than satisfied with his work and from what he says, I am sure I would like it as well and will do my utmost to win your professional praise.

  • I am long on effort and enthusiasm, although short on experience. Examples of my passion for doing the job well are in references I gained as a student from my employers and customers, such as the following achievements: (list references).

  • In my last position, managing an assisted-living facility, I saved 8% of the annual budget without compromising care; I would welcome sharing the details with you in a meeting to discuss the possibility of my joining your well-respected organization.

  • My senior year’s academic result: A 3.7 GPA with President’s Honors, despite my student job requiring 30 hours a week, illustrates that I know how to dig in and get the job done.

  • With my technical skills and understanding of your market, I can step into the position and be immediately productive.

  • At my previous position on the East Coast, within two years I received praise for playing a key role in raising my branch’s basement ranking for customer service (#57 out of 60 stores) to top ranking customer service (#3 out of 60 stores) in the nationwide organization.

  • Accustomed to doing more with fewer resources, I can help your firm ride out a financial storm in a tight economy. After meeting with me and assessing my ability to run a tight ship that sails upright, you may decide you can’t afford not to hire me.

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The Essentials of Cover Letters

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