How to Regularly Review Your Marketing Strategy

What’s your marketing strategy? Is it a pure version of one well-known strategy, or is it a variant (or even a combination) of more than one of them? Whatever it is, take some time to write it down clearly and thoughtfully. Put it in summary form in a single sentence. (If you must, add some bullet points to explain it in more detail.)

After you write it down, don’t put it away in a drawer and forget about it. Keep it close by and review it on a regular basis.

Write a strategy that’s a clear statement of the direction you want your business’s or product’s marketing to take. This statement needs to be a big-picture game plan. With this strategy on paper, you can work on designing good products and packaging, friendly services, and impressive ads that communicate your quality to consumers. Here’s what one company’s marketing strategy looks like:

Our strategy is to maximize the quality of our security alarm products and services through good engineering and to grow our share of a competitive market by communicating our superior quality to high-end customers.

After you develop a marketing strategy, be sure to follow it and make it obvious in all that you do. In fact, it’s highly recommended that you do some formal planning to figure out exactly how you’ll implement your strategy in all aspects of your marketing program.

After you adopt a specific marketing strategy, you must actually read it from time to time and check that you’re following it. I’m often amazed at the lack of relationship between marketers’ strategies and their actions. Everyone involved in your organization’s marketing needs to understand how their work ties to the strategy.

Outside vendors you work with need to be aware of your marketing strategy, too. When you interact with a graphic designer, web designer, ad rep, list broker, or tech support person from any of the big online web environments (Google and Facebook being great examples of where to purchase well-focused web ads), tell them your strategy. “We are trying to … ” finish the sentence with whatever is appropriate for you, such as “attract serious collectors of antiquarian books,” “let people know that they don’t have to feed their families grocery store food with low nutritional value and many contaminants,” or “bring broadband interfaces to every trade show display.”

Your strategic imagination is the only limitation to your growth, but make sure you share your vision with everyone who contributes to your marketing.

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