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How to Find Federal Resources to Help You Write Your Grant Applications

4 of 9 in Series: The Essentials of Finding and Applying for a Grant

Most government agencies that award grants or contracts produce publications that can give you a leg up on writing all types of grant applications and RFP narratives. You can find these valuable resources from each government agency’s information clearinghouse.

Check out agency Web sites for Resources or Publications links. You may encounter any of the following publications:

  • Bulletins: Summarize recent findings from government program initiatives. Designed for use as references, they may contain graphic elements such as tables, charts, graphs, and photographs. You can re-create some of the most current and relevant graphics in your application's needs statement or program design.

  • Fact sheets: Highlight, in one to two pages, key points and sources of further information on government programs and initiatives. You can cite the most recent facts (never more than five years old) in your application's needs statement.

  • Journals: Highlight innovative programs or carry articles about critical issues and trends. You can cite some of the model programs at the beginning of your application's program design section to show how you’re modeling your project on a successful program. You can also use any critical issues or trends covered in journals in your needs statement.

  • Reports: These documents contain comprehensive research and evaluation findings; provide detailed descriptions of innovative programs implemented at the national, state, and local levels; and present statistical analysis, trends, or other data on selected topics. Reports may include explanations of case studies, field studies, and other strategies used for assessing program success and replication.

    Some reports provide training curriculums and lesson plans, as well. You can cite research on evaluation findings in your needs statement. Innovative programs that are considered models can be cited in your program design section to build the basis for proposing your own program model.

  • Summaries: Summaries describe key research and evaluation findings that may affect future policies and practices. Summaries highlight funded programs implemented at the national, state, or local level that may serve as models for other jurisdictions.

    These publications are generally 30 to 90 pages in length and usually include appendixes and lists of resources and additional readings. You can cite research on evaluation findings in your needs statement. Innovative programs that are considered models can be cited in your program design section to build the basis for proposing your own program model.

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