This short Yoga routine focuses on the areas of the body that you want to strengthen as you prepare your body for giving birth. Make sure you have consulted your physician to be sure you have no special circumstances before beginning any prenatal exercise routines.

1

Mountain posture: Tadasana

One of the benefits of the mountain posture during pregnancy is that it directs your attention to your posture during this period when your weight and balance have gradually but steadily changed.

After you find your center of balance, begin the process of making a mental shift, using the breathing style of your choice. Stay in mountain posture for 6 to 8 breaths.

2

Warrior I: Vira bhadrasana I

As its name suggests, warrior I strengthens the legs and improves stamina and balance. It’s especially beneficial during pregnancy because it stretches your hips and helps with tension in your neck and swelling in your fingers.

Move into and out of the posture three to four times, and then stay for 6 to 8 breaths on each side.

3

Warrior II: Vira bhadrasana II

Another variation in the warrior family, this powerful posture opens your hips as it builds stamina and strengthens your arms. Move into and out of the posture three to four times, and then stay for 6 to 8 breaths on each side.

4

Standing wide-legged forward bend: Prasarita pada uttanasana

This modified forward bend improves circulation in the head and lengthens the spine, hamstrings, and adductor muscles on the inside of the thighs. Just hang in this posture for 6 to 8 breaths.

You can also try this standing posture with your hips at a wall or door.

5

Triangle posture: Utthita trikonasana

The triangle posture stretches the sides of the spine, the back of the legs, and the hips while it opens the chest. Move into and out of the posture three to four times, and then stay for 6 to 8 breaths on each side.

6

Supported chair squatting posture: Modified ardha utkatasana

The supported chair squatting posture builds overall stamina while it strengthens your back, legs, shoulders, and arms. Move into and out of the posture three to four times, and then stay for 6 to 8 breaths.

Use an actual chair unless you feel comfortable without it. Use a wide stance to maintain your center of balance.

7

Cobbler’s posture

This posture is a wonderfully relaxing way to end this short routine. Use an advanced breathing technique that doesn’t require breath retention, such as alternate nostril breathing, and/or a meditation technique.