How to Answer Add-a-Rule and Open Logic Game Questions on the LSAT

Some logic game questions on the LSAT are ones that either add a temporary condition or ask an open question about the original conditions. Both types ask for answers that are true, false, or possible. Read the question carefully to make sure you know which answer type you’re looking for and which answers to eliminate.

  • True: For questions that seek a true answer, eliminate answer choices that either must be false or could be false. These questions may be worded like these:

    • Which one of the following must be true?

    • Each one of the following could be false EXCEPT:

    • Which one of the following CANNOT be false?

    • Which one of the following must be selected?

  • False: For questions that seek a false answer, eliminate answer choices that either must be true or could be true. These questions often look like these:

    • Which one of the following CANNOT be true?

    • All the following could be true EXCEPT:

    • Which one of the following must be false?

  • Could be true: For questions whose answers are possible or true, eliminate answers that must be false. The questions may look like these:

    • Which one of the following could be true?

    • Each one of the following must be false EXCEPT:

  • Could be false: For questions whose answers are possible or false, eliminate answers that must be true. Questions could be worded like these:

    • Which one of the following could be false?

    • Each one of the following must be true EXCEPT:

Generally, add-a-rule questions are faster to answer than the open type because they allow you to limit your game board a little more. To answer the questions that add a rule, apply the temporary condition to your game board and play with the new possible arrangements. Then, depending on whether the question asks for what’s true, false, or possible, eliminate answers.

Questions don’t build on one another, so the temporary condition supplied by an add-a-rule question applies only to that question. Don’t take it along with you to the next question in the set.

You handle open questions much the same way you do those that add a rule, except that you don’t enter additional information on your game board. Focus on what type of answer — true, false, or possible — you seek, and eliminate choices accordingly.

Open questions can be the most time consuming. If your game board is thin, sometimes the only way to answer them is to apply each answer choice to the game board. So you may find it easier to answer some of the other question types in a set before you tackle this type.

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