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How to Access Previously Used Commands on the TI-Nspire

TI-Nspire offers a convenient way to copy and paste an expression in order to perform similar calculations. Consider that you want to use the quadratic formula to solve the equation x2 + 3x – 9 = 0. For starters, access the Fraction template, a secondary function located on the

image0.png

key, which pastes the Fraction template to the entry line with a blank numerator field and a blank denominator field. Type the numerator; then press [TAB] to move to the denominator, type [2], and press [ENTER] to evaluate the expression.

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The second solution to this equation can be evaluated by making a slight edit to the expression just entered. Here are the steps to follow:

  1. Press

    image2.png

    twice to highlight the previous expression (see the second screen).

  2. Press [ENTER] to paste this expression to the entry line.

  3. Use the keys on the Touchpad to move the cursor to the right of the + sign in the numerator of the expression.

  4. Press [DEL] to clear the + sign and press [–] to insert a subtraction sign.

  5. Press [ENTER] to evaluate this revised expression (see the third screen).

You can fill a total of 99 lines on a single Calculator page. If you don’t clear your history, any of up to 98 previous entries can be pasted to the entry line.

To clear the Calculator history, simply press [MENU]→Actions→Clear History.

If you choose to clear the history, all previously defined variables and functions retain their current values. Use the Undo feature ([CTRL][ESC]) to restore the history if you mistakenly delete it.

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