Great Twitter Marketing Ideas in 140 Characters

These thoughts on how to use Twitter as a marketing tool come from experts all over the world. Many marketing experts replied by tweet, so all the advice here comes to you in nuggets of 140 characters or less.

  • Marketing:

    • @DavidSpinks If you’re not seeing results, it’s probably not Twitter’s fault; it’s how you’re using it. That’s ok.

    • @BeerFoxTM Have you written a lot? Tweet the titles of all articles you have written, and each URL, so your followers can easily find them.

    • <Anonymous> Marketing is about promoting what your expertise is & how that is advantageous to someone else. Now get tweeting that!

    • @watsonk2 Tweet 80% content your readers will find helpful and 20% self-promotion. A good mix will get you farther than 100% promotion.

    • <Anonymous> Find the perfect balance between the quantity of your tweet and the quality.

  • Promoting your brand:

    • <Anonymous> You are the brand!!! Nothing else. You’re selling yourself as a person and showing that you are worthy of being followed.

    • @Alonis DO NOT PUSH YOUR PRODUCT. There, in 25 characters.

    • @azvibe Don’t use Twitter if all you’re going to do is promote the latest and greatest or ask for help for your business. Be yourself!!

    • @bnyquist Don’t constantly change your avatar as it’s one of the main consistencies in your online branding.

    • @brianspaeth If you murder someone, don’t tweet about it. Bad for the brand.

  • Building relationships:

    • @divinewrite Help people.

    • <Anonymous> Be the first to share. Get an RSS feed of topical news for your industry and post a link as soon as breaking news hits the search engines.

    • <Anonymous> Use Twitter as way to grow your networks on other social media channels. It can be the hub of your social media wheel, each channel a spoke.

    • @mooshinindy Be yourself on Twitter. People will either love you or hate you for it but at least it’s you.

    • @appellatelaw If someone you know has good news, but is too modest to tweet about it, you might consider tweeting about it yourself.

  • Engaging in Conversation:

    • @calamity7373 Create a dialogue with your followers; don’t just push promotions about your brand in their face.

    • @virtualewit Twitter is a conversation. Take some time to listen to what is going on and respond; don’t just talk at people.

    • <Anonymous> Don’t just talk about your product; talk about your area of expertise.

    • @hatmandu Don’t just use auto-follow tools to spam legions of people — instead, create individual conversations.

    • @followthecolson Twitter is not a scripted dialog. It is an open conversation between you, your followers, and your potential followers.

  • Following and followers:

    • @bradjward Don’t get caught up in the numbers game. 100 relevant followers on Twitter is worth more than 1,000 followers any day of the week.

    • @sarahebuckner It drives me crazy when people don’t post for a few hours, then post 9 times in a row. If they do that a lot, I unfollow.

    • <Anonymous> First — get followers. Second — keep followers. Sounds easy, right? It’s actually not. It takes patience and hard work.

    • @Arsene333 Before you click Send, ask yourself “Would I follow this person solely based on this one tweet?” If yes, clink Send.

    • @jecates Following thousands of people hoping to get their attention is more likely to get you blocked than followed.

  • Using Twitter wisely:

    • @krisplantrich All tweets are read — not just your branding or marketing ones. Be careful what you tweet!

    • <Anonymous> Keep your business and personal life separate. Would you like to see someone you were considering to do work for you drinking on a boat?

    • <Anonymous> Twitter works best when integrated. Use it to supplement blogging and other social media efforts.

    • @unmarketing Twitter is a conversation about your business/industry, whether you’re there or not. Your choice.

    • @wowbroadcasting Add the Twitter icon to your website.

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