Advertisement
Online Test Banks
Score higher
See Online Test Banks
eLearning
Learning anything is easy
Browse Online Courses
Mobile Apps
Learning on the go
Explore Mobile Apps
Dummies Store
Shop for books and more
Start Shopping

Encrypt Your Samsung Galaxy S 4

Besides implementing a screen lock, this is the other option for protecting your Galaxy S 4. This is an exceptionally secure option: It scrambles every file on your phone into gibberish, which it rapidly descrambles when you need it. This sounds great; however, there are some important considerations to think about.

First, all this scrambling and descrambling takes processing power away from other things, like running the apps. This is hardly noticeable in most cases because your phone is awash in processing power. However, you never know when it might come back to bite you.

Next, after you encrypt your phone, you can never switch your phone back to non-encrypted. With the Screen Lock options, you can use a PIN for a while, and then switch back to the pattern if you want. Not so with the encryption option. You will never, ever, ever, ever, get it back together.

If you encrypt your phone and then forget your password, your phone is what is called bricked. That means that its only use in the future would be in house construction as a brick because you're not going to be able to use it as a smartphone any more.

If you are sure that encryption is for you, here are the steps:

  1. From the Apps Screen, tap the Settings icon.

    Again, this is old hat by now.

  2. Tap the More tab.

    This is older hat by now.

  3. Scroll down and tap the Security icon.

    This brings up the options shown in this figure.

    image0.jpg
  4. Tap the Encrypt Device option.

    This brings up the screen shown in the figure.

    image1.jpg

As the screen says, have your password ready, the battery at 80 percent or higher, and set aside an hour when you don't need to use your phone. This time, the password must include at least six characters with at least one number. In this case, the password “password1” is also off the table. This is the second password that thieves routinely try.

  • Add a Comment
  • Print
  • Share
blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement
Advertisement

Inside Dummies.com

Dummies.com Sweepstakes

Win an iPad Mini. Enter to win now!