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Electronics Safety Lesson: Keep Safety Equipment on Hand

In spite of every precaution you might take, accidents are bound to happen as you work with electronics. Other than preventing an accident from happening in the first place, the best strategy for dealing with an accident is to be prepared for it, so keep the following items nearby whenever you're working with electronics:

  • Fire extinguisher: So you can quickly put out any fire that might start before it gets out of hand. Make sure that the pressure is at the recommended level. On extinguishers equipped with a gauge, the needle should be in the green zone. Fire extinguishers should be pressure tested (a process called hydrostatic testing) after a number of years to ensure that the cylinder is safe to use.

  • First-aid kit: For treating small cuts and abrasions as well as small burns. The kit should include bandages, antibacterial creams or sprays, and burn ointments.

  • Phone: So that you can call for assistance in case something goes really wrong.

  • Friend: The buddy system works. If your project works with household current (120 volts), a friend can help in case you get shocked. The friend doesn’t have to be right by your side; just within yelling distance or a phone call away.

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