Setting Output Resolution to Print Big Pictures
Making the Connection Between Pixels and File Size
Computer Monitor Resolution

Computer Printer Resolution

Printer resolution is measured in dots per inch (dpi). Printed images are made up of tiny dots of color, and how many dpi the printer can produce defines that printer’s resolution. The higher the resolution, the smaller the dots, and the better the printed image. But different printers use different printing technologies, some of which result in better images than others. Some 300-dpi printers deliver better results than some 600-dpi printers.

You can get different results with the same image printed on a low-resolution printer (right) and a
You can get different results with the same image printed on a low-resolution printer (right) and a high-resolution printer (left).

Some people (including some printer manufacturers and software designers) mistakenly interchange dpi and ppi (pixels per inch), which leads many users to think that they should set their output resolution to match their printer resolution. But a printer dot isn’t the same thing as an image pixel. Most printers use multiple printer dots to reproduce one image pixel. Every printer is geared to handle a specific output resolution, so you need to check your computer manual for the right output resolution for your model.

blog comments powered by Disqus
Why Choose Raw (NEF) over JPEG on Your Nikon D5200?
The Different Types of Digital Camera Image Sensors
How to Choose the Right Resolution for Your Dog Photos
Nikon D5200: How Many Pixels Are Enough?
How Many Pixels Are Enough in Your Digital Images?
Advertisement

Inside Dummies.com