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Avoid Being Obsessive or Neurotic About Food

Being mindful and choosy about what you eat isn’t the same as being obsessive or neurotic about food! Making smart choices from an informed and empowered position is desirable, whereas making decisions out of fear or deprivation can lead to guilt, resistance, overcompensation, and even eating disorders.

Food isn’t your enemy, and you can’t build a successful, healthy eating plan if you consistently act out of fear or resentment. To tell yourself that you’ll never eat sugar again is unrealistic and shortsighted. Your goal should be to be better, not to be perfect. Any food plan that uses the word “never” is destined to lead to begrudging and bitter feelings, and ultimately, failure.

Obsessing over every tiny detail of your diet, being a control freak, and trying to be perfect are behaviors that stem from the fear of a lack of ability or personal power. Every time you find yourself at a decision point, remember that you’re the decision-maker and the driver of your destiny.

Empower yourself to make positive decisions in all phases of your life, and don’t allow a fear of setbacks drive you to an obsessive or neurotic view of food.

Friends can provide an enormous amount of support on your quest to eat better, but obtaining assistance from a trained professional is often helpful. If you’d like to receive some professional help with mindful eating or if you have concerns about obsessive eating habits, consult the National Eating Disorders Association website for information and treatment referrals.

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