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Add a New Slide to Your PowerPoint 2007 Presentation

You can add a new PowerPoint slide to your presentation in many ways when you’re working with the PowerPoint outline. This list shows the most popular methods for adding a new slide to your presentation:

  • Promote existing text: Promote an existing paragraph to the highest level. This method splits a slide into two slides.

  • Promote new text: Add a new paragraph and then promote it to the highest level.

  • Press Enter: Place the cursor in a slide’s title text and press Enter. This method creates a new slide before the current slide. Whether the title text stays with the current slide, goes with the new slide, or is split between the slides depends on the location of the cursor within the title when you press Enter.

  • Press Ctrl+Enter: Place the cursor in a slide’s body text and press Ctrl+Enter. This method creates a new slide following the current slide. The new slide is always created after the current slide. (The cursor must be in the slide’s body text, however, in order for this method to work. If you put the cursor in a slide title and press Ctrl+Enter, the cursor jumps to the slide’s body text without creating a new slide.)

  • Insert a new slide: Place the cursor anywhere in the slide and use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+M or click the Add Slide button in the Slides group of the Home Ribbon tab.

  • Duplicate an existing slide: Select an existing slide by clicking the slide’s icon or triple-clicking the title and then press Ctrl+D to duplicate it.

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