3 Healthy Juice Recipes for IBS Sufferers

Everyone needs nutrition, especially people with IBS-D, who often limit themselves to white rice and white bread and can become malnourished. One of the best ways to get this nutrition is by drinking healthy juices. If you have IBS-C, juices are good for you too because they're high in antioxidants to deal with the toxins being absorbed through the large intestines along with water.

If you're experiencing IBS-C, prune juice and lots of water may be just what you need. Prune juice is a very gentle yet effective laxative. It contains an unpronounceable substance called dihydrophenylisatin that's responsible for its laxative action. Water provides lubrication and bulk to help things move along and replace fluids that are continually reabsorbed through the colon.

Juices are so rich in nutrients that a couple of mouthfuls can give you a boost, especially if you chew your juice. No, don't leave chunks of juice ingredients in your drink, but do take a mouthful of juice and swish it around your mouth before swallowing.

(You may recall that food absorption starts in your mouth, where your saliva begins to break down your food. In fact, one-third of your carbohydrate digestion process is completed in your mouth before it hits your stomach.)

If you don't know whether you're absorbing a food or drink, just do a quick survey of the contents of your toilet bowl. You'll see the color of the juice you just drank or some bits of food that you thought you chewed and digested. If that happens, eat more slowly, chew more thoroughly, and add digestive enzymes.

Chop up your vegetables and fruits somewhat before putting them in a juicer. Doing so causes less wear and tear on your appliance.

Lovely Bones Juice

Angela Elliott has found a way for you to get your calcium and magnesium in a tasty glass of juice. Apples are high in soluble fiber, ginger is a digestive aid, and lemon is good for the liver — all in all, a very IBS-friendly drink.

Tools: Nut milk bag (optional)

Preparation time: 5 minutes

Cook time: None

Yield: 2 servings

2 apples, quartered

5 kale leaves

1 handful parsley (about 1/2 cup)

Juice of 1/4 of a lemon (about 1⁄16 cup)

1 inch ginger

1 celery stalk

  1. Juice all the ingredients; alternately, you can chop them up, combine them in a blender, and strain the mixture through a nut milk bag.

  2. Pour into glasses and drink up.

Per serving: Calories 125; Fat 0.7 g (Saturated 0.1 g); Cholesterol 0 mg; Sodium 42 mg; Carbohydrate 31.1 g (Fiber 5.9 g); Protein 2.2 g; Sugar 19.6 g.

Ginger Love!

Ginger is a true friend to people with IBS. Not only does it soothe the digestive system but it can also help alleviate the uncomfortable gas that plagues many people. Ginger has some anti-inflammatory compounds called gingerols that are powerful enough to work on arthritis and can soothe an inflamed colon.

Ginger is great at alleviating a variety of digestive problems. [Credit: ©egal, 2010]
Credit: ©egal, 2010
Ginger is great at alleviating a variety of digestive problems.

Tools: Nut milk bag (optional)

Preparation time: 5 minutes

Cook time: None

Yield: 2 servings

1/4 inch ginger

2 apples, quartered

Juice of 1/2 a lemon (about 1/8 cup)

  1. Run ginger and then the quartered apples through a juicer, or chop them, blend them, and strain them through a nut milk bag.

  2. Mix in the lemon juice and serve.

Per serving: Calories 101; Fat 0.3 g (Saturated 0.05 g); Cholesterol 0 mg; Sodium 3 mg; Carbohydrate 26.7 g (Fiber 4.5 g); Sodium 19.2 g; Protein 0.6 g; Sugar 16.5 g.

Pick Me Up

This recipe focuses on apples, which are rich in antioxidants. For people with IBS, apples are a mainstay and help with both ends of the IBS spectrum. Take them raw but peeled for IBS-C. Sauce them up into applesauce or bake them in the oven for IBS-D, again removing the peel, which has too much insoluble fiber.

Cilantro gives this juice a distinct flavor that most people love. You can use just the juice of the lemons, or you can peel off the outer skin (leaving the white rind) and run the lemons through a juicer.

Tools: Nut milk bag (optional)

Preparation time: 5 minutes

Cook time: None

Yield: 3 servings

1 bunch cilantro (about 12 ounces)

3 apples, cored and quartered

1 medium cucumber, cut lengthwise

8 to 10 celery stalks

Juice of 3 lemons (about 3/4 cup)

  1. Juice the cilantro, apple, cucumber, and celery, or chop them, blend them, and strain them through a nut milk bag.

  2. Mix in the lemon juice and serve.

If you don't like the flavor of cilantro, try swapping out the cilantro bunch for 6 ounces of parsley or 4 to 6 ounces of mint.

Per serving: Calories 139; Fat 0.6 g (Saturated 0.1 g); Cholesterol 0 mg; Sodium 90 mg; Carbohydrate 36 g (Fiber 6.8 g); Protein 2.1 g; Sugar 23.7 g.

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