By American Diabetes Association

You don’t just inject insulin anywhere you want on your body. That’s not safe. Instead, there are techniques and tips for properly injecting insulin and making it as smooth and pain-free as possible. Ask your diabetes educator, nurse, or another provider for step-by-step instructions on injecting insulin.

Insulin is injected, using a syringe or pen, into the layer of fat that lies directly under your skin. The fancy name for this fat is subcutaneous tissue. Some of the best places to do that are your abdomen, thighs, and the backs of your upper arms. Your healthcare provider can instruct you on the best places to inject insulin and how to do it.

You can rotate the exact site of the injection so you don’t get lumps or buildup of scar tissue. One technique is to think of the injection site as a 1-inch diameter circle. Choose a different, non-overlapping circle each time you inject and rotate within that part of your body, such as your abdomen. For site rotation techniques see the following figure.

diabetes-injection
Courtesy of the American Diabetes Association

Injection site rotation techniques.

Injecting insulin isn’t easy for some people. Those with dexterity or vision problems, for example, may need a little extra help. There are lots of devices on the market that can help you overcome pain, anxiety, vision impairment, and dexterity challenges. Check out the latest issue of Diabetes Forecast’s annual consumer guide for details on injection aids or search the web for injection aids and look for highly rated and popular injection aids.